Tag Archives: teaching

Colossians 2:6-7; Brief Thoughts

Therefore, as you received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk in him, rooted and built up in him and established in the faith, just as you were taught, abounding in thanksgiving.

“Walk,” meaning to conform one’s life in a certain direction or to follow a particular pattern. It is such as simple exhortation… walk. Throughout Scripture, God’s people are instructed to “walk.” Abraham is told to walk to a land God would show him. Moses and the Hebrews are forced to walk around in the desert. Joshua is told to walk around a city. The Kings are told to walk in the statutes that God has given them. The prophets call the people to return to walking in the way God has given them. Jesus calls his disciple to walk after him. And the Apostles call Christians to “walk in [Christ]” (v.6). The term “walk” is used 96 times in the New Testament and is commonly used to refer to a general pattern of life.

Paul exhorts Christians to live a lifestyle that is consistent with Christianity. Exhortations are instructions that are based on previously established facts or commonly held beliefs. Paul’s exhortations to “walk” are based on the reality of the indwelling Spirit of Christ in the heart of all who believe. Because Christians have trusted Christ and are subsequently changed by that faith, Paul says, “walk in Him.” In other words: live a lifestyle consistent with that claim of faith.

The life of a believer is one that is “rooted and built up in Him and established in the faith…” and is marked by an abundant and prolific “thanksgiving” (v.7). First, the believer’s faith is “rooted” in Christ. Consider for a moment what it means to be “rooted.” This means that the source of nourishment and strength are drawn from a foundational relationship with Jesus Christ. For Christians the source of life in Christ. As it is with roots, so it is with Christians. The deeper the roots go into the foundation, the stronger the life of the plant. Further, any progress in growth as a Christian also results from Christ. Alongside being “rooted,” Christians are also “built up in [Christ].” Christians derive their strength and encouragement from Christ and knowing Him. He is the source of encouragement and strength.

Another defining Characteristic of those who “walk in Him” is that they are “established in the faith.” Christians have a strong faith. It is strong because it is not dependent on the work of the person, it is dependent on Christ and what He has already accomplished. Paul uses the term “faith” here to describe the collected system of beliefs and doctrines common to Christians. These doctrinal truths that Paul asserts the Colossians are established in are basic to all Christianity. The collected truths that Jesus Christ die for sins, has risen from the dead, ascended into heaven, and is returning one day to reclaim all creation for Himself, is made strong in the heart of a believer precisely because Christ’s Spirit has indwelt those who believe in Him (see further 1 John 2:27). Those who “walk in Him” are marked by a faith that is strong and growing.

Notice that this exhortation to “walk in Him” is followed by descriptors that are past tense. The characteristics of “rooted,” “built up,” and “established” are all traits that already exist in the life of one who is called to “walk.” The faith of a believer is the foundation and strength that one depends on in order to walk in the way of Jesus. It is because of the firm relationship and growing knowledge of Him that believers are able to “walk.”

Believers are marked by gratitude. Gratitude stems from an accurate understanding of God’s work with the heart. True believers recognize the worth they bring to the table of salvation. They know all too well what wretched beings they were before Christ. They are aware of the depth of their sin and disgrace and as a result. They are aware of the death that once claimed their souls. Christians know that they have been redeemed by mercy and not personal or corporate merit. It is not the merit of the Christian or the community that redeems the believer. It is the life and sacrifice and of merit of Jesus Christ. That is the motive for thanksgiving. Thanksgiving marks the heart of a believer. Imagine what this world would look like if every person who claimed the name of Christ were identified as incredibly grateful people who look and live like Jesus. Would it not be a sight to behold!?

 

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Colossians 1:21-23; Brief Thoughts

21 And you, who once were alienated and hostile in mind, doing evil deeds, 22 he has now reconciled in his body of flesh by his death, in order to present you holy and blameless and above reproach before him, 23 if indeed you continue in the faith, stable and steadfast, not shifting from the hope of the gospel that you heard, which has been proclaimed in all creation under heaven, and of which I, Paul, became a minister.

There is no merit within a man that does not derive its value from Jesus. As established in verses 15-20, Jesus is the agent and sustainer of all creation. Further, He is the one who brings reconciliation through His work. In order to understand what change has been wrought in the souls of those who believe, we must first begin by understanding that it is Jesus’ work that brings redemption.

Some people would dare to assert that they have achieved some state of reconciliation based on their own merit or decisive action. However, Paul’s words here describe the state of all of humanity before Christ. Every person is distant from God – the Author and Sustainer of life. Not only is all mankind held at a distance from God by sin, each individual person has waged a war on God’s righteousness and holiness. From the beginning, humanity has shaken its fist in the face of a perfect, holy, and just God. Rebelling both in mind and in deed. The rebellion of sin is not merely one of intellect, it progresses to action in “evil deeds.” The hostility that is conceived in the mind of a man against God becomes manifested in the actions of sinful rebellious deeds.

This description of man shows a complete deprivation of all semblance of righteousness. There is first distance/separation in the word alienation. The term for “alienated” means excluded, or estranged. It indicates a foreign nature in the one described. The one who is alienated is one who does not belong and has no place. Before Christ’s work, people have no place of belonging and no home with God. Further, every individual is at enmity with God, exercising hostility of mind in, and through evil deeds.

Christ does not allow such deprivation of spirit to remain in His created ones. Instead, He brings peace in His death. Taking upon Himself the sins of man, He bares those sins before God and dies in order to defeat the effects of sin. In His body, Christ dies that you might believe and thereby have life. Christ comes to those who reject Him and reconciles to Himself those who have waged war against Him.

Consider the lengths to which Christ has gone to reconcile you to God. He lived a perfect life, surrendering strength in favor of weakness while simultaneously holding all things together. He experienced trial, turmoil, and temptation on a level we cannot fathom and yet remained faithful and righteous. He commanded the waves to be still and materialized fish and bread at will and yet, He submitted to death at the hands of the very people in whom He breathed the very breath of life. Then He willingly died, surrendering to death that you might live. In His sacrifice, He carries upon Himself the death you deserve and frees you from the grip of sin. In His death, sin dies.

So, in this way, Christ takes the punishment for sin upon Himself and frees the souls of those who believe so that the faithful can stand, blameless before God. Jesus presents the believer to God as spotless and blemish free. Not only are those who believe presented as cleaned of sin before God, they are also proven to be free from sin as “above reproach!” Let that sink in for a moment: if you believe in Jesus, you can stand before God without even the possibility of question. You are “above reproach.” The adversary can say nothing about you. Accusers cannot speak against you. You stand before God, unable to be questioned. You are beyond the reach of accusation. In Christ, you have been granted a status that is beyond the reach of questioning. Note: this state is not due to your actions. It is because of Christ’s great sacrifice. In His work, you’ve been made “above reproach.” Because your condition is based on His actions, even your past sins cannot be raised in objection to you. You have been reconciled through Christ, completely.

That is if you remain. Many who claim Christ do not remain faithful. According to Paul, these people do not fall into the category of “reconciled.” Those who do not remain faithful to the gospel have not been reconciled to be presented to Christ. Hold fast to Christ as evidence that you have been reconciled.

Colossians 1:20; Brief Thoughts

19 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross. [1]

A great war ended in one death. Indeed, the war that should have resulted in the extinction of all humanity. So great was the rebellion of man that the wrath of God against all injustice should have been exercised against the creatures who rejected His majesty. The depth of brokenness in man has set man against God. So small a creature, incapable of even the most simple of tasks. Mankind cannot even raise itself to do one thing that is truly good. Man is so completely depraved that we will shake our fists in the face of the God who created us while simultaneously refusing to acknowledge that He exists. Yet, God considers these insignificant creatures worthy of salvation.

Jesus, the Christ, is God made flesh. He came to earth from heaven and lived a perfectly righteous life. Then He surrendered His life to the hands of the creatures that He made and submitted to death. In His death, He took upon Himself the wickedness of all who believe in Him. Jesus willingly carried a cross and offered Himself up as the recipient of God’s justice on our behalf. You have only to trust in Him for salvation.

Through Jesus, God brought peace to the souls of mankind. Further, God ended the war that was waged so long ago and restored Sabbath rest in Jesus. Life is in the blood. In Jesus’ death, we find life. His blood was poured out that you may live. Trust His atoning work and be saved.

Take note of a few details. First, Jesus is the agent of reconciliation. In the same way that Jesus is the agent of creation. He is also the sole means of re-creation. That is to say, He is the ONE by which salvation is accomplished. There is no other way to be at peace with God. Jesus is the only one. Second, His atoning work is so great that it reconciles “all things.” Consider that for a moment. All things are reconciled to God through Jesus Christ. God has determined that He will bring peace to all creation through Jesus’ atonement. ALL CREATION. He brings reconciliation to “all things, whether on earth or in heaven.” Creation was broken and separated from the love and mercy of God. That changes in Jesus. Now Sabbath rest is restored in Jesus… for all creation. Third, this reconciliation only comes through Jesus’ blood offered in sacrifice on our behalf. A death was required and God met the requirement for you. Whereas it was appropriate to slaughter mankind in order to sustain wrath and justice, God saw fit to sacrifice Jesus in your place.

[1] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2016). (Col 1:15–20). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

Colossians 1:16; Brief thoughts

16 For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him.

Jesus is God. He is not a created being, nor is He dependent on anything for existence. He is God and by definition, He has life within Himself. All life stems from Christ, for “by Him all things were created” (v.16). It is for this reason that we understand “firstborn” in verse 15 to be referring to primacy and priority rather than temporality. For indeed, Jesus is the creator and it is by Him that all things are made.

The extent of His creation does not simply end with what the eye can see. Rather, Jesus created everything! That which is visible: the trees, land, humanity, and the like; and that which is invisible: the spiritual realms, air, and those things which are intangible. Consider for a moment the breadth of this creation. Jesus has made that which mankind interacts with on a daily basis, both the known and visible parts of creation as well as the unknown and invisible parts. There is no thing in existence, no power that prevails on earth or heaven, and no being that has been that He did not create. Jesus has created all things.

So, Jesus created the dictator. He created the wicked politician. He created the spirits that manifest themselves in depression. He created the spirits that try to rule over humanity in His place. Jesus created these. It is difficult for any compassionate Christian to accept that Jesus created the Hitlers of this world. Yet here it stands in verse 16. Jesus created the thrones and dominions and authorities. There is no distinction of morality in this list. The only distinction made is that some are invisible while others are visible. Yet, this is the power of Jesus Christ in creation. He has created all things. Not only the things that accept His lordship and authority but also those that war against the King of Glory. He is creator over all. In this way, Jesus exemplifies an incredible benevolent love. He creates beings that will in no way accept Him as their creator and then allows them to persist. The fact that Jesus allows wicked politicians to take a breath in this life should astound the most reasonable of people. His love and patience are so great that He has created beings that exist to prove His patience. Romans 9 puts this thought in beautiful perspective when it speaks of men as clay in the potter’s hands, espousing that God has the right to create both righteous and wicked.

Not only does Jesus have the right to create whatever He pleases, He does so with an expressed purpose. All of creation has been drawn into existence “for Him” (v.16). There is a tremendous purpose for creation. It is the purpose of salvation to exalt the name of Jesus. Creation exists to show God’s character and to display His glory. All of creation, both that which is seen and unseen, exists to glorify Jesus.

Humanity, in general, denies this truth. Humanity attempts to place man at the center of creation as first priority (c.f. Romans 1:23). Yet, Jesus is patient. It is the denial of the truth of Jesus’ infinite worth and priority that causes so many of the problems within the western church. When churches focus their activity around the preferences of human agents and not around the exaltation of Christ, then the church becomes ineffective and worthless. It is the role of all creation to glorify Jesus. It is the role of the church to model how to do that.

Colossians 1:15; brief thoughts

15 He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation.

Sin blinded the eyes of mankind so that no man could see God. The very image of God was marred and broken by the fall of man. In the beginning, God created mankind in the image of God and commissioned man and woman to spread His image and glory across the world (Genesis 1:26-28). Yet, Adam sinned and as a result, the image of God was shattered (C.f. Romans 5). As history has progressed, God’s image has become more and more depraved through the work and sin of man. Indeed, so great is the fall of man, that man no longer resembles the image of God.

The loss of this image is the loss of communion with God. God’s creation has been severed from Him by sin: the willful rejection of God by the beings that are supposed to reflect Him. God began His work with the intention of spreading His own image across the earth. His mission has not changed. Christ comes as the image of God. He is the perfect reflection of the glory and character of God. Being God, Himself, Christ is God. Thus, when you have seen Christ, you have seen the Father (John 14:9). That severed communion is re-created and restored in Jesus Christ. In knowing Jesus, we can know God.

The image of God is the son of God. He is the heir to all that God has. Jesus, being one with God, is also distinct as the second person of the Trinity. He is the Son. He is the image of God and bears the same essence as God, yet remains uniquely individual. His position in the Trinity is best understood in human terms as, Son. In this way, we can understand that He inherits all the wealth of God. This is what is meant by “firstborn.” This is not to say that Jesus was a created being. He was not created. He has been God from the beginning (c.f. John 1:1-5). He was not created but born. The terminology of birth here is specifically addressing priority. Jesus is firstborn of creation in the sense that He is the first in priority.[1]

Jesus is the image of God, and the firstborn. Consider for a moment the implications of such truth. In Jesus, men can see what is invisible. The invisible God of all creation is made visible in Jesus Christ. Further, He is the One on whom priority in all things rest. He is the first to be worthy. He is the first to be recognized. He is the first to be worshiped. He is the first to receive glory. He is the first to be honored. He is the first to speak. He is the first to whom one should listen. He is the first in authority. He is first in position. He is first in majesty. He is first in mankind’s affections. He is the first to work. He is the first! He is first. There are too many things and people to which western Christianity ascribes priority. Too many things take the place of first priority over following and knowing Jesus. Yet, Jesus remains first. If anything else stands in front of Him, then truth is lost.

Jesus is not granted the priority based on man’s acceptance of that order. Rather, Jesus is given priority because that priority is the truth. Jesus being firstborn does not depend on man’s opinion of His position or authority. He simply is firstborn. He is the Son of God. This is truth and it needs no validation from humanity. All the earth could reject Jesus Christ and still, He remains: the image of God, firstborn.

 

[1] For a fuller examination of this I recommend John MacArthur’s commentary on Colossians.

Colossians 1:13-14; Brief Thoughts

13 He has delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son, 14 in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins. [1]

The Father has “qualified” believers to be adopted as children of God. He qualified believers by making them worthy. Verses 13-14 explain what it is that God did to make Christians worthy. In one motion, God has moved those who trust in Him from darkness to light in Jesus Christ.

People need rescue. Every individual is guilty of sin against a holy and magnificent King, who has every right to destroy all of humanity. Mankind has rejected God’s authority and determined to find righteousness on their own. In doing so, humanity has embraced the darkness and consciously rejected the Creator. The Bible articulates this reality using terms such as “sons of disobedience,” “children of slavery,” “accursed children,” and “children of the devil”(Ephesians 5:6, Galatians 4:31, 2 Peter 2:14, and 1 John 3:10). God has, first, rescued believers from the “domain of darkness” (v.13).

The “domain of darkness.” Before trusting in Christ all of humanity is under the rule of darkness. Darkness floods the soul of man making it impossible to discern between good and evil. On the rare occasion that a person does achieves some sort of altruistic motives, the darkness that blinds that person will inevitably destroy any positive work that one can muster. People are so blinded that they will not live up to the righteous requirements of a holy and perfect God. Further, this world is dark. Darkness has a level of dictatorship over the world in which humanity walks. This is what Paul means when he asserts that “the days are evil” and that the “natural man does not accept the things of God” (Eph. 5:16 and 1 Cor. 2:14). Darkness has such tyrannical control over the minds of people that there is an overwhelming unwillingness to pursue righteousness. But hope remains, God, the Father has rescued those who trust in Jesus from the control and authority of darkness. The power of darkness to blind the eyes of man has been overcome. The authority of sin in the life of a believer has been defeated because of Jesus. No longer is a believer subject to the dominion of evil. Now a believer is a child of the light and lives with the freedom to reject sin.

The believer’s freedom is secured by their citizenship. While darkness reigned over the unbeliever, the believer now is secure in the kingdom of Jesus. In contrast to the slavery of darkness, the kingdom of Jesus Christ offers freedom. Freedom to reject sin and pursue holiness. While in darkness, humanity is incapable and unwilling to reject sin. The nature of man is so bent towards darkness that righteousness seems utterly absurd. Yet, once transferred to the citizenship of heaven, the believer is empowered to stand against sin and pursue holiness. The worthy Christian life is made possible by the destruction of sins power and the transfer of allegiance.

To be a citizen of Jesus’ kingdom is to live in stark contrast to darkness. “God is light, and in him is no darkness at all” (1 John 1:5). Light exposes people and places on display the truth of character. Darkness hides the truth and allows wickedness to go unchecked. Light declares and embraces the disparity between God’s holiness and man’s unrighteousness. Darkness attempts to deny such disparate conditions. Light reveals both the need of man and the love of God. Darkness deceives unrighteous men into believing that they are righteous and have no need of God’s love. The Kingdom of Jesus Christ is the Kingdom of light.

Jesus serves as the atoning sacrifice for the sins of those who believe. He has redeemed His saints and has forgiven their sins. All who trust in Jesus are forgiven and redeemed. All who trust in Jesus can stand before God and know His love and call Him Father (c.f. John 20:17). Before Christ, humanity views God as an enemy while resting in the false comfort of darkness. After Christ, the darkness is exposed and driven away to reveal the beauty of God’s love for His own and the nature of a believer is changed in view of His holiness.

[1] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2016). (Col 1:13–14). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

Colossians 1:12; Brief Thoughts

12 giving thanks to the Father, who has qualified you to share in the inheritance of the saints in light.

The third refrain describing the worthy Christian life beckons the believer to gratitude. Indeed, one of the greatest hallmarks of the Christian faith is that of a cultivated gratitude for the presence and work of God. So it is with genuine believers that gratitude overflows from the soul into the world around them. In Ephesians 5:4, gratitude is urged as a defining character trait of the Christian’s speech. In Philippians 4:6, Christians are urged to combat anxiousness with gratitude. In 1 Thessalonians 5:18, Paul calls believers to “give thanks in all circumstances.” In 2 Thessalonians, the saints are encouraged to give thanks for salvation.  In 1 Timothy 2:1-2, Paul calls for prayers of thanksgiving to be made for everyone, including pagan Kings. In 1 Timothy 4:1-5, Christians are urged to give thanks for everything they receive.

The spirit of gratitude, cultivated in the life of a believer is absurd. It is a spirit that thanks God for persecution, famine, destruction, as well as freedom, plenty, and life. This Spirit urged among the believers of the first century, no doubt, seemed even more obscene. As Paul urges Christians to express gratitude to God, the Christian religion is experiencing tremendous persecution. Yet, in the face of rejection and death, Christians are to say thanks. Thanks for destruction? Christians are to be grateful for the loss of everything? Truly? Yet, it is the Spirit of God that lives within believers and empowers such obscene gratitude. Though the world collapse and reject everything the Christian holds dear, still, the Christian contradicts such resounding rejection with love and gratitude. The Christian life is a contradiction of worldly values. Believers seek a value that stands in stark contrast with the values of this world and its systems. It is precisely this contradiction that is manifest in the Christian’s gratitude.

Where does such profound contradiction come from? A Christian’s faith results in gratitude for all things because a Christian’s faith is from the God who is over all things. It is “the Father” from whom the ability to respond in gratitude is received. It is also to Him that gratitude is given. He has granted life where there was death and brought light into darkness (c.f. Ephesians 2:1-8). The God of all things, the Maker and Sustainer of all life, has granted Christians an inheritance where there once was none.

Note: He “qualified” believers for this inheritance. The word used here means “to make sufficient” or “to render worthy.”[1] Consider that for a moment. God has made Christians worthy. He has, in His infinite grace, established those who believe in Him as worthy. Those who love Christ need not strive to be worthy. They simply are worthy. They are worthy because the Father has made them worthy. He has changed their condition from sinful, unworthy, and wicked to saintly, worthy, and righteous.

All mankind rejects God. There is no one who is righteous on their own, indeed, all are sons of disobedience (c.f. Romans 1-3 and Ephesians 2). Yet, God, in His kindness, saved those who believe in Him, granting orphans adoption. Forgiving those who deserve death. From this realization, springs gratitude. Mankind is wicked and deserving of death, yet God’s love and favor persist. No person can look upon the face of God, behold His majesty and glory and persist in self-righteous pride. No person can be confronted with the reality of His holiness and still deny His goodness and grace. In the face of such a God, the only acceptable response is gratitude.

Ponder for a moment the truth that He has changed the soul of those who believe. The very nature of the individual who confesses Christ has been displaced and replaced with a new nature that is entirely changed. A nature that has been made worthy of the holiness of God. A nature that has been qualified! Thus, the worthy Christian life is one in which this deep and powerful truth transcends our mundane existence and draws us to our knees in gratitude. This gratitude is present in the light!

The light… everyone can see the Christian. The flaws and weaknesses. The failures and trivial affections. Christians receive an inheritance as children of “light.” There is no hiding in the light. One is entirely exposed in the light. Even so, the stark contrast of the unworthy sinner who has been deemed worthy by God and the holiness of God must draw the Christian to gratitude. For such a change of condition is too great to be observed passively. It demands an exchange of self-righteousness for humble gratitude. Christians cannot stand in pride or pretense. They have been exposed before a holy and righteous King who has deemed them worthy by His own act of benevolence.

[1] Zodhiates, S. (2000). The complete word study dictionary: New Testament (electronic ed.). Chattanooga, TN: AMG Publishers.