Tag Archives: prayer

Galatians 2:7-10; Brief Thoughts

7On the contrary, when they saw that I had been entrusted with the gospel to the uncircumcised, just as Peter had been entrusted with the gospel to the circumcised 8 (for he who worked through Peter for his apostolic ministry to the circumcised worked also through me for mine to the Gentiles), 9and when James and Cephas and John, who seemed to be pillars, perceived the grace that was given to me, they gave the right hand of fellowship to Barnabas and me, that we should go to the Gentiles and they to the circumcised. 10Only, they asked us to remember the poor, the very thing I was eager to do.

The modern western church holds in high esteem people of influence. Pastors are valued because of the size of their congregation or the reach of their pulpit. Credence is given to men who can market well and appeal to a large audience. Leaders are given honor because of their ability to engage people, often ignoring or dismissing a lack of character. Not so with the early church! These men of God held in high esteem those who with honesty and integrity presented the gospel clearly.

When Paul stood in the Jerusalem council and presented his case for the uncircumcised, the other apostles accepted his ministry because of “the grace that was given to” Paul (v. 9). Paul had been a murderous agent of the Pharisees prior to his conversion. Yet, Christ saw fit to grant him grace and deliver him from his own sinfulness. Surely if God can transform His enemy into a child, then He can do the same for the ignorant Gentile who knows nothing of God’s Law. Consider further Saul’s reputation among other Christians. Prior to Damascus, Paul was a scourge to Christianity. He was a villainous adversary to Christ and the church. Ananias received a special vision from God and granted grace to Paul as a result – accepting him into the fellowship of believers. Finally, a man who was such a horrible adversary could not be expected to be given such a fruitful ministry. Yet, Christ saw fit to grant Paul grace in his ministry. It was that grace that served as Paul’s resume.

Consider for a moment what it would be like if your resume was entirely based on Christ’s work in your life. Consider the strength of a fellowship that recognizes others as equal recipients of the gift of life. What would it be like if you were judged by the work and effort that God has done for and in you? Further, what if you granted favor to other believers simply because God has given grace to them? What if you granted grace to others according to the grace that has been extended to you in Christ? Infinite, marvelous, and matchless grace has been given to you! Indeed, this is what we are called to do as Christians. We are to see one another through the lens of grace. We are to recognize our state as those who have been redeemed not by merit, but by the grace of an infinitely loving King!

Such an understanding of grace does not permit a Christian to hold another to a system of religious law. Rather, it drives the believer towards holiness and, instead of merely avoiding sin, leads to a community of faith that exhorts one another to live holy according to the guidance of the Holy Spirit through the Scripture. In such a community, there is no place for superstars. When Paul explains that the same grace worked through Peter as has worked in Paul, he levels any sense of superiority in the life of the Christian community. If anyone was worthy of extra prestige and honor in the first century of the church, it was certainly Peter. Yet, Christianity is not a merit-based, legal system. It is, in contrast, a system based on the grace of God and it is dependent on the mercy of God for its life.

When Paul sought wisdom over the question of circumcision of Gentile believers, he sought the community of faith and entrusted himself to the Holy Spirit’s leading. Trusting in the grace of Christ, Paul stood before the Jerusalem council as an equal recipient of the Grace of God and counted upon that grace to manifest itself among them. Paul and Peter did not get bogged down in the minutia of laws and legal morality. They lived in a system of grace with one another, addressing struggles and difficulties when they rose. Rather than setting up sign-posts and rules that explained what you could or could not do, the early church favored asking deep questions about motivation and dealing with each individual struggle as they arose. In this, the community thrived and holiness blossomed. When the community spends its efforts attempting to manage behavior, the community becomes lifeless. When the community strives towards holiness by exhorting each other in grace, then that community thrives!

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Galatians 2:1-6; Brief Thoughts

2 Then after fourteen years I went up again to Jerusalem with Barnabas, taking Titus along with me. 2 I went up because of a revelation and set before them (though privately before those who seemed influential) the gospel that I proclaim among the Gentiles, in order to make sure I was not running or had not run in vain. 3 But even Titus, who was with me, was not forced to be circumcised, though he was a Greek. 4 Yet because of false brothers secretly brought in – who slipped in to spy out our freedom that we have in Christ Jesus, so that they might bring us into slavery – 5 to them we did not yield in submission even for a moment, so that the truth of the gospel might be preserved for you. 6 And from those who seemed to be influential (what they were makes no difference to me; God shows no partiality) – those, I say, who seemed influential added nothing to me.

When the joy and delight of one’s life on centered on Christ, there will inevitably be those who desire to usurp that joy by laying restriction and rule atop of freedom. Indeed, those who do not know the freedom of Christ will either long for it, or they will seek to control it. Such was the case in the Galatian church. Those who had been given freedom in Christ Jesus were being instructed by others who had come to join in the community to lay aside that freedom for the sake of an appearance of holiness. This holiness was not genuine but was a legalistic and self-righteous attempt to achieve holiness through their own actions.

Their message was antithetical to Paul’s own commission. As he recounts in verse 2, Paul corroborated his preaching of the Gospel by setting it before the Jerusalem council so that he could make sure the Gospel he was teaching was correct (Acts 15). Fourteen years after beginning to preach the gospel, Paul sought to ensure that the gospel he was teaching was correct. Paul’s efforts to validate himself by seeking the wisdom of the apostles stands in stark contrast to those who demanded such legalism professed by those who were infiltrating the Galatian church. There are no arrogant demands that people submit to his message. Rather there is a humble submission to the message as it stands clear in Christianity.

Paul submits to the clear message of the gospel. Influence and prestige, once so highly esteemed in the life of Saul the Pharisee, were cast aside for the sake of truth. Paul does not bend to the influential or nor does he bend himself to become influential. As is often the case with the most influential people in Christian history, Paul is more concerned with the message than with his own honor and prestige.

Further, Paul does not slip in. Paul’s efforts to teach the gospel are extremely transparent. He lays his teaching out before the apostles with a brother, Barnabas, alongside to hold him accountable. He stands exposed, ready to be corrected. Those who would profess self-made righteousness do not present themselves so clearly. They hold back their message, crafting words in such a way as to hide their true meanings and agenda. This is not the way of Christ! Christians speak boldly the gospel and when we are wrong, we seek the admonition and correction of the community of faith.

Finally, Paul does not accept the voice of the famous. Take note, dear reader, there are no accolades or praises given to men and those in authority in this passage. As Paul recounts his experience it is as one who has sought truth within a community of gospel believing Christians. He does not slip in, he does not seek to control the faith of others, and he does not attempt to demand that others live by his own convictions. He simply and purely lays out the gospel with clarity and strength.

Sometimes it is difficult to recognize when false teachers attempt to slide in and usurp freedom. This passage gives us some characteristics to look out for.

  1. They force their morality on others. These legalists prize morality over truth. Paul offers a contrast in Titus, explaining that he was not required to get circumcised in Jerusalem (v.3). The gospel relies on Scripture and the conviction of the Holy Spirit in the heart of believers. Thus, those who follow Christ trust the Scripture to convict and call others to changed lives and particular morality.
  2. They slip in, unnoticed. False teachers are never obvious at first. It takes time for the revelation of falsehood to be revealed. More often than not, those who seek to rule over the church and deprive others of gospel life appear first as friends and even Godly leaders. Yet, time will reveal their deceptions and motives as contrary to the gospel.
  3. They prize influence over transparency and submission. Those who know not the redemption of Christ value their own authority and the fame and prestige of others to a higher degree than humble submission and honesty. These false brothers will speak with great admiration of those who have accomplished much with worldly success while disparaging the persistent ministry of faithful saints who bear much spiritual fruit with little material gain. They will quote famous false teachers and excuse overt sin or error if there is material success. They will appeal to positional authority instead of trusting the truth to defend them. They will cite their position as if it was given them by God and state that as their authority to make decisions.

When seeking to lead the church, we must be diligent to watch out for those who are false teachers.

Brief Thoughts: Galatians 1:21-24

21 Then I went into the regions of Syria and Cilicia. 22 And I was still unknown in person to the churches of Judea that are in Christ. 23 They only were hearing it said, “He who used to persecute us is now preaching the faith he once tried to destroy.” 24 And they glorified God because of me.

One of the most common character traits among great Christian leaders is a startling lack of desire for fame. There is a profound humility that accompanies the self-aware Christian. It is a humility born out of the understanding that man’s works and achievements cannot secure salvation. Paul certainly grasped the weighty truth that God alone must save. It is this truth that drives the bulk of his letter to the Galatians. Paul is not redeemed because he deserves redemption or has earned righteous covering. Rather, Paul is acutely aware that his own salvation is the result of grace extended from God’s hands to him. Likewise, any exaltation or honor for the work of the gospel after Paul’s conversion is due to Christ alone.

Reflecting on his journey in Christ, Paul explains that he was obscure and unknown in person to the Christian leaders for several years. He did not travel to Jerusalem and was not trying to advance politically. Indeed, in his former life of Judaism, Paul had attempted to make a name for himself, climbing the ranks of religious leadership. His Christian journey is marked by an attitude contrary to his former life. He seeks no fame nor accolade for himself. His testimony bears witness that he is concerned with the glory of God, not his own fame or fortune.

Beware of those who seek to make their own name great. Those supposed men of God who must have their names printed on everything are truly men who are seeking their own glory. A leader who seeks his own glory is not a leader worth following. Instead, seek to follow leaders who are obsessed with the glory of God and His kingdom. A Godly leader is one who will place the exaltation of Christ above his own prestige.

Paul seeks the glory of the Lord and early on in his ministry was privileged to be used by God to acclaim Jesus’ name and glory. Indeed, Paul recognizes that true joy is found not in fame or self-exaltation, but in lifting high the name of Jesus.

In Western Christianity, there is a pressure among teachers and preachers of the gospel to make their own names great. Marketing strategies, blogs, video curriculums, and the like are sold with particular teacher’s names attached and there is a particular glory that is often ascribed to these teachers. Consider Paul’s testimony in light of such a reality. He was not known to any of them personally, nor was he a famous teacher. Yet, the Lord used his testimony to further the Gospel and in this Paul found his value. “They only were hearing it said, ‘He who used to persecute us is now preaching the faith he once tried to destroy.’ And they glorified God because of me” (v. 23-24).

If we desire to glorify God above ourselves there are a few things we can learn from Paul.

  1. Seek to grow in your knowledge of God in fervent, God-obsessed, self-obscurity. Paul begins his discipleship process among unknown saints. He joins the disciples in Arabia (1:17) and does not pursue any of the big names until three years into his growth as a Christian (1:18). Learn to cultivate a love for obscurity. In this modern age, obscurity can be a blessing. When everything is put online for the world to see, there is little room for error or mistake and there is less forgiveness than there is room.
  2. Train yourself to find value in God’s glory. As Paul reflects on his life, he finds his value in knowing that his past wickedness is used to glorify God. There is certainly shame over his past life, yet God has redeemed him and is using his former self-righteousness to exalt the Gospel.
  3. Think heavily about grace and strive to extend it to everyone. A cursory read of Paul’s life in the book of Acts will show that he became obsessed with grace. Recognizing that the law could not save and that his previous successes as a Pharisee meant very little in the Kingdom, Paul demonstrates that God saves whoever will come (John 6:37). There is no preference given to one group over another, only grace extended to every weary and repentant sinner. Even the apostle Paul had to learn to cultivate grace. Paul’s relationship with Barnabas certainly helped him learn to extend grace to his brothers and sisters in Christ as is exemplified in his reaction to John Mark and his apparent shift from early in his ministry to the place of 2 Timothy 4:11.

Learning to practice these three things will help to cultivate a vision for God’s glory over self-exaltation. In the long run, these will bring you much more joy in your Christian walk.

 

 

Galatians 1:18-20; Brief Thoughts

18 Then after three years, I went up to Jerusalem to visit Cephas and remained with him fifteen days. 19 But I saw none of the other apostles except James the Lord’s brother. 20 (In what I am writing to you, before God, I do not lie!) 21 Then I went into the regions of Syria and Cilicia. 22 And I was still unknown in person to the churches of Judea that are in Christ.

Paul’s insistence that he was introduced to the Gospel through a supernatural encounter with Jesus as Lord can lead readers to believe that there was no discipleship in his life. However, a simple read through the book of Acts reveals Paul’s own journey as one that involved the community of faith and particular men who poured intertwined their lives with Paul, vouching for his character, encouraging his relational growth, and sitting with him while he wrestled with the deep truths of the gospel.

After his initial conversion, Paul was directed by Christ to go to Ananias in Damascus and there Paul recovered his sight and began to live among the saints as one of their number (Acts 9:10-22). Three years later, Paul travels to Jerusalem and spends 15 days learning from and with Peter and James. In Acts 9:26-31 Paul attempts to join the disciples and they avoid him because of his past persecutions. It is at this moment that one of the greatest disciple-makers in Scripture takes hold of Paul and begins to train him in the gospel. Barnabas begins to walk with Paul and teach him the way of Christ.

In Paul’s story, Barnabas serves as his mentor. Though Paul failed to connect with the disciples in Jerusalem, God provided a brave and bold brother who loved others deeply to disciple this stubborn scholar. Barnabas and Paul fought side by side to advance the gospel (Acts 13-15). Barnabas and Paul would eventually separate over Paul’s opinions about John Mark, Barnabas’ cousin. After years together, Barnabas and Paul continue the mission without each other. It is tempting to see the separation of Acts 15:36-41 as a failure of the disciple-making process. However, it is natural that leaders will eventually need to separate from one another and pursue their own specific assignments in the gospel ministry.

Paul had a miraculous conversion and certainly a radical and spontaneous transformation. However, this transformation was shaped and refined in community through careful discipleship. God gave Paul a community of faith that could help mold his ministry and empower him as a leader. Paul was so acutely aware of his community that he writes of them at the end of every letter, including those who are walking with him in the moment. In truth, Paul’s life before Christ was marked by a personal exaltation and a kind of lone-wolf fame. However, as a Christian, Paul is almost never alone. On the rare occasion that he is alone, God provides a convert.

Paul’s testimony in Galatians may lead young Christians to think that they do not need to be discipled or trained in the Gospel. This is a fundamental misunderstanding of Paul’s growth. Paul was poured into by other believers throughout his ministry. He had a brother who dedicated himself to serving alongside him in Barnabas. Barnabas taught Paul a great deal and Paul’s character changed as he walked with Barnabas. Then Silas walked with Paul and offered kinship. Oh, Christian, God has so much more for you than lone-ranger Christianity. He has formed a community in the Church that can and does help you grow. Don’t mistake Paul’s testimony for one that denies the influence of any community. Paul is simply reminding the Galatians that his own faith is just that – his own.

Paul’s faith is not from Peter or the Apostles. Indeed, as discussed above, Barnabas played a much more significant role in Paul’s growth than the other leaders of the Church. For three years Paul lived the faith out with brothers and sisters whose names we may never know. The point of his testimony in Galatians is not that he did not learn from anyone, but that his authority and understanding of salvation is not drawn from any man.

Paul understood what discipleship is. He recognized that the Holy Spirit is the teacher and we learn together from Him. His work and life are testaments to the truth that believers grow best in community.

So, to whom are you connected? What community are you growing with? Paul’s testimony is certainly not prescriptive for the average Christian. Indeed, everyone’s testimony is unique and individual. However, we can still learn from Paul’s journey. He needed Barnabas to walk with him. He needed the unnamed believers in Damascus to encourage and help give him a start. He needed Silas to walk with him in his later mission work. He needed Timothy and Titus to receive his discipleship. You need the community as well. There is no such thing as a Christian devoid of community. You need the body. To put this simply: go find a church and plugin.

Galatians 1:10; Brief Thoughts

10 For am I now seeking the approval of man, or of God? Or am I trying to please man? If I were still trying to please man, I would not be a servant of Christ.

Many modern church leaders seek fame and publicity. They persist in ensuring that their names are known and exalted in this life. In effort to secure the praise of men, many compromise the message of the gospel. Some diminish the gospel by omitting difficult parts and others choose to emphasize one aspect at the cost of the whole gospel. Seeking the praise of men, these leaders steal the glory due to God and proudly place crowns on their own heads. These men are to be pitied and mourned over, they will one day answer to the God of glory, whom they have stolen from.

Paul was accused of such a theft. The men who accused Paul of this robbery of God’s glory were guilty of the very crime of which they claimed Paul was complicit. Seeking the praise of men, they postured themselves as holy leaders of the church. Still Paul, honestly presenting his own testimony, insists that he is not seeking the praise of men. Indeed, if Paul were seeking such accolade from mortal men, then the letter to the Galatians would never have been written. Such a testimony of Jesus’ glory and righteousness does not serve to make Paul great. Rather, as Paul will soon testify, his former success as a righteous Jewish Pharisee amounts to no value in light of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Any glory he once tried to attain for himself is now counted as nothing and has resulted in scorn and accusation from men, but will result in honor from God.

A man cannot be a servant of Christ if he strives for the praise of men. Further, it is the motive that determines the position. Paul states that he “would not be a servant of Christ, if [he was] still trying to please man.” If Paul’s motive is to please men, then he proves himself to be a servant of men and not of God. Likewise, those who profess Jesus as King and then serve motives to enhance their own glory are not serving Jesus, but their own self-interests. So, Paul calls into question the accusation itself. “Am I now seeking the approval of man, or of God? Or am I trying to please man?” The answer is obvious that Paul is not attempting to please men.

Paul will later explain that he has seen what it means to please men. He has stood among the apostles and rebuked them for showing deference to the Jews over the Gentiles believers. He has challenged Peter and defended the truth of Jesus in the face of radical hatred. Paul is acquainted with the reality of preference. He knows what it looks like and he has scorned it. He has surrendered prestige and honor for the sake of Christ.

Grace extends beyond me. If praise lands on me and not Christ, then I have cheapened grace. You see, if I matter more than Christ or if I am concerned about praise that I received, then I have brought the value of grace to my level. Here is a story that may serve as an example of what I mean:

I was once eating with an old friend from high school who was asking me about what I do for a living. My friend was of another religion. As a pastor, I have a few answers to this question, I reached into my bag-o-answers and said, “I spend a lot of time counseling people and helping them to live a full life. I walk alongside people whose marriages and lives are in turmoil and help them to understand a better way to live. I teach people what life is and help them to live it to the fullest.” My friend nodded sympathetically and said, “You are a great man who is really making a difference in this world.” At that moment I realized I had failed to exalt Christ. In my attempt to explain what I did, I soften the message of the gospel. I took the Gospel of salvation and explained it as if I was the message. Sorrow filled my heart the moment I heard him say this. The Gospel is so much greater than me. Though I may do some good things, Christ actually forgives sin and changes the souls of believers to give them life! He is the gospel, not me! Yet I had reduced the ministry of the gospel to my work! Needless to say, I no longer answer that way. Now my answer is, “I teach people about one true God, Jesus Christ!” It’s a much more awkward answer, but it is true.

When we seek the praises of men, we drag the Gospel down to the dirt and cover up the real message. Let the Gospel stand exalted in Heaven! That way it will save people and lift believers up to Heaven!

In evaluating our own understanding of grace and exaltation of the Gospel, there are some questions we can ask ourselves.

  1. When I am called by God to say or do something, am I pausing to consider the reactions of men?
  2. When Scripture is plain, am I softening what it says in order to make it more palatable to those around me?
  3. When I meet someone for the first time, am I honest and transparent about the gospel or am I attempting to please the other person?
  4. When I see injustice, do I answer with the gospel or do I hesitate because of the other people around me?

 

A New Book! Expressions: Church Poems

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This year, as resolutions swirled in my head and evaluations of the previous year set me into a constant state of pensive self-examination, I wanted to challenge myself to write and complete a book of poetry and art in one week. I knew the difficulty that it would entail and I knew the joy of completing the process.

2018 seemed like a marathon through the mud. As a pastor, I trudged a great deal and OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAwas often fighting my own depression and difficulties as I helped to shoulder the burdens of others. It was a good year, but it was a long and exhausting year too. We came through it tired but victorious and ready to run some more.

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As I sat, laboring to understand and process 2018, I found a need to express. I needed to express my love for the church. I needed to express the wrestling with depression in a real and spiritual manner. I needed to express the “striving together” that is the church community. I needed to lay down on paper the weight of what my community has carried together. All the imperfections and struggle to understand grace.

All the pains and joys of community and weight of self. I needed to express them all. I needed to express the song of the church. So, I set out to draw a few sketches and lay down a few verses.

“Expressions” is the result. (Credit to Logan Doak for the title.)

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Expressions: Poems of the Church is available for $7 on Amazon.com and Lulu.com

 

I hope you will enjoy this work. It is short, 48 pages, and is a square shape. It is intended to be a book of pictures and poetry that you will pick up and read once in a while. The art is simple and quick sketches that were drawn in a week (with the exception of “Halos of the Church” and “Death to Life,” which were drawn in 2018 when processing some difficulties). I have endeavored to exalt Christ in the church through this work. Please use it for the gospel ministry.

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Two quick encouragements:

Challenge yourself. Challenge yourself to do something. Something difficult. Last year I was enjoying my morning coffee while I watched the birds flit and flutter on my porch. Inspired I wrote a short poem and then started drawing some pictures. At the same time, I was working through the book of Ephesians for my second published work. I challenged myself to write a short book, complete with artwork and be ready to publish it in a 7 day period. The result was “The Bird’s Psalm.” This year I wrote a little more… next year I will challenge myself to do the same.

Use your talents for the Kingdom of God. I am not a great artist, but I have some talent. I am not a great poet, but I can write a poem or two. I am not a great writer, but I can write stuff down in an organized form. The Lord has blessed me with some ability, it is my responsibility to use that for the Kingdom. What are your talents? Are you using them for the Kingdom? I hope you see through my work that you CAN do something for the Kingdom. I hope you will be inspired to do something… something worthwhile. Something for the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Galatians 1:6-7; Brief Thoughts

6I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting him who called you in the grace of Christ and are turning to a different gospel – 7not that there is another one, but there are some who trouble you and want to distort the gospel of Christ. 

There are many modern gospels in the world in which we live. Many are obvious, insidious corruptions of the truth of the gospel. Often, false gospels bear an additional moniker at the beginning such as, “prosperity gospel,” “poverty gospel,” or “justice gospel.” These gospels obviously make Jesus secondary to another issue and contort the word of God to proclaim something other than Christ as ultimate. Anytime a word proceeds gospel, it is reducing the majesty of the gospel itself. These can be quickly identified and rejected soundly.

Some false gospels are less obvious. These are ones that espouse a Jesus plus something for salvation. Paul is dealing with this kind of false gospel in Galatians. The believers in Galatia were being instructed that they needed Jesus plus the law. Some Jewish brothers had arrived and were trying to blend Judaism with Christianity, insisting that Christians needed to adhere to the law of Moses in order to be saved from the wrath of God. Yet the gospel requires no law, no works to merit salvation, no extraneous duty laid upon vessels of mercy. The gospel of Jesus Christ is that He has done the work for you. You have only to trust in His righteousness for your salvation. Repent from sin and believe that Jesus died on the cross for your sins and God resurrected Him from the dead that you might have life!

Knowing that the gospel is a message of grace alone, it is only natural that Paul would be “astonished” (v.6). Indeed, why would anyone desert the one true God “who called [to them] in the grace of Christ”(v.6)? Notice the assumption in Paul’s language: believers are “called… in grace!” The very calling to faith has been an act of grace and is accomplished by Christ. The gospel is given freely to believers by the grace of Jesus Christ alone! Oh, dear believer, it is not your righteous behavior that grants you the grace of Christ, but it is the work and love of Christ! Not only is your own work not sufficient, but your own motivation is also insufficient to draw you to the gospel. In Romans 3:10-20 Paul explains the reality that no one actually seeks after God and even the base desire of humanity is one that denies the glory of God. So, if someone has been transformed by the gospel of Jesus, then it is astonishing that such a person would revert to so wretched a state.

The adversary cannot truly invent a different gospel. The work of the enemy is one of contortion of truth, not creation. No one can create out of nothing but God. Likewise, no one can bring salvation from death except God! He brings life from the dead and light out of darkness. He transforms the souls of men, redeeming the unredeemable. No, the adversary cannot create a new gospel, he must distort the truth and deceive the hearer. His tactics have not changed from Genesis 3. He still asks, “has God really said..?” (Gen. 3:1). He still adds a simple word to the consequence saying, “you shall NOT surely die” (Gen. 3:4). False gospels are dangerous because of one word misstated or one truth slightly slanted from the plumb-line. They distort the Word of God by simple and slight adjustment.

This is why it is so important for the believer to study the Word of God with great attention to what it says. The Word of God means what it says. It ought not to be dismissed or restated to mean something else. The Bible must be taken for what it says. I can remember a Sunday School class in which the teacher quoted Jesus and then stated, “that doesn’t mean what it says.” I have heard other preachers say such things as, “if this passage meant what it says, then we would have a serious problem.” In casual discussion with other theologically minded people I have been told, “I cannot accept what the Bible says about that because of my understanding of Jesus.” This is the way the gospel becomes distorted. The Bible means what it says. If you cannot accept what the Bible says, then you are beginning to believe a false gospel. Repent, believe the Bible.

Here are three recommended habits for developing a healthy understanding of the gospel.

  1. Do a “quiet time” or devotional daily. If you will simply read a little of the Bible each day, you will begin to see SOME growth in your life. Devotions are not intended for deep study, they are intended for setting your mind to follow after God. As you read, you will find that the message of the gospel becomes normative in your thought processes.
  2. Do a deep study once a week. People usually object to this one on two bases. So let’s address these.
    1. You have time for this. Don’t lie to yourself and say, “I do not have time to study the Bible in depth!” Do you have a regular show you watch? Do you have a regular activity that takes 30 minutes? You have time.
    2. Some people argue that they don’t have an understanding of how to do deep study. Well, go ask your pastor to help. In western churches, we have more resources than any other time or place in history. Buy good books and read good blogs that can help! (I recommend Precept Ministries International’s study materials for learning how to study your bible. You can find them here).

Get some material to help, set aside some time and get to work. Deep study is a delight to the heart of a Christian! Take some time each week and delight yourself in God’s word! In doing so you will develop a deep and mature understanding of the gospel.

  1. Attend and be involved in a church community. God designed the gospel to be lived out on this earth. You need other people to do that. One of the greatest and easiest ways to grow in your faith is to attend church and Bible studies. That’s right, attend. Attendance is the key. You cannot be successfully involved in a church community if you do not attend. Make the effort and attend. Otherwise, you will find your heart drifting away from the community of faith, no matter how dedicated they are to meet your needs outside of regularly scheduled gatherings. Attend a church community and do so faithfully. As you attend and intertwine your life with the lives of others, you will find that some people frustrate you, some bless you, some drive you insane, and some people are just kind of there. This is a tool for your growth, do not abandon the plate because you don’t like the vegetables. It is good for you, suck it up and keep going, eat the whole plate of food.