Colossians 4:5-6; Brief thoughts

Walk in wisdom toward outsiders, making the best use of the time. Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how you ought to answer each person. [i]

The final exhortation given to the church of Colossae is to “walk in wisdom” (v. 5). Believers ought to strive to live a wise lifestyle. The term translated “walk” refers to a general pattern of life. It refers to a lifestyle. It is not a term that is used in reference to moments or temporary struggles but is one that indicates a general practice of life.[ii] Generally, Christians ought to live a lifestyle that is characterized by wisdom. The word used for wisdom indicates a “skill in the affairs of life, practical wisdom, wise management as shown in forming the best plans and selecting the best means, including the idea of sound judgment and good sense.”[iii] A believer, who has understood what Christ has done to change and transform their own heart, will certainly exemplify such a life. They will strive to live a life of excellence and devotion, “as to the Lord” (Colossians 3:23).

The jury of a Christian’s life is the outside world. Even Christ echoed the sentiment of just judgment of the authenticity of believers when He said, “By this, all men will know that you are truly my disciples, if you have love for one another” (John 13:35). Our Lord and Master gave the world permission to test the veracity of our faith by judging our actions. Paul exhorts us to live wisely towards those who are outside the faith. Walking in such a lifestyle demands that we are careful with how we spend our time and what we give our attention to. Time is against us in this life. It does not slow down and it is easy to waste. So, Paul calls us to be attentive to the time we have and use it wisely.

The encouragement that follows wise living is that your speech would “always be gracious, seasoned with salt…” (v. 6a). What proceeds from the mouth, comes from the overflow of the heart (Mat. 12:34). The most tangible evidence for the purity and strength of the heart is that which comes from the mouth. If one is wise, then the tongue will speak wisdom. What is the evidence that comes from your mouth? What do your words reveal about your heart? Paul’s call to wisdom is particularly addressing the relationship between Christians and those who are outside the faith. The greatest testimony one can give to the transformative power of the gospel is the lifestyle they live. That lifestyle must be consistent with their speech. So a Christian’s speech ought to lead people to see the transformation that has occurred within their own heart.

Paul explains that this speech is to be “gracious, seasoned with salt” (v.6). Put simply, Christians ought to make the world better. Gracious speech is kind speech. It is a considerate voice amidst a world that denies kindness. Further, grace brings beauty and benevolence to the subject. If a person is consistently gracious to others, they will be an agent of refreshment and beauty to the world around them. This kindness that overflows from a wise lifestyle makes the difficulties of this world more palatable. Like salt in a meal, so the true believer’s speech brings taste to a tasteless environment.

Finally, wisdom dictates that one ought to be able to answer the questions and needs of the surrounding world. If your speech is flowing from a wise life and is “gracious” towards others, then you will be able to answer the difficult questions that are posed by an anxious world. This is not to say that Christians have all the answers, but that their lifestyle is supported by their public proclamation of truth. There are questions that are difficult to answer. Yet, the hope that covers a Christian’s life and the wisdom by which they maintain their consistency provides an answer. Though it may not answer every nuance of every theological inquisition, wise living and gracious speech give answer and evidence to a changed life wrought by Christ.

 

[i] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2016). (Col 4:5–6). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

[ii] Some translations attempt to explain this discrepancy by adding the word “practice” or “continuing” to their translations. For example, “no one born of God practices sin” (1 John 3:9 NASB).

[iii] Zodhiates, S. (2000). The complete word study dictionary: New Testament (electronic ed.). Chattanooga, TN: AMG Publishers.

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