Colossians 4:9-11; Brief Thoughts

and with [Tychicus], Onesimus, our faithful and beloved brother, who is one of you. They will tell you of everything that has taken place here.

10 Aristarchus my fellow prisoner greets you, and Mark the cousin of Barnabas (concerning whom you have received instructions—if he comes to you, welcome him), 11 and Jesus who is called Justus.[1] These are the only men of the circumcision among my fellow workers for the kingdom of God, and they have been a comfort to me.

Who are these people with Paul?

Onesimus – (Philemon 8-22).

Onesimus was a runaway slave who became a believer in Jesus and connected with Paul. In his letter to Philemon, Paul explains that Onesimus had become useful to the gospel witness and he pleads with Philemon to take Onesimus back as a brother and not a servant. Paul calls Onesimus “faithful and beloved,” the very same descriptors of Tychicus. These brothers are entrusted to deliver the message of God to the Colossians.

Consider for a moment that a former slave who has been transformed by the gospel  is delivering the message of Colossians. This letter is been focused on discovering the Christian’s new identity as it is in Christ. It is quite appropriate that a man who has had such a dramatic shift from slavery to freedom is responsible for delivering a message that speaks of a dramatic shift from slavery in sin to freedom in Christ. Onesimus is a living analogy for salvation.

Aristarchus (Acts 19:29, 20:4, 27:2, and Philemon 1:24)

A Macedonian believer, Aristarchus was one of Paul’s “companions in travel” (Acts 19:29). He was present at the riot in Ephesus and spent significant time with Paul in Ephesus. In the midst of extreme danger, Aristarchus remained faithful to stand by Paul. Further, exemplifying the Macedonian spirit, Aristarchus has given all of himself to the mission of God. He has sacrificed his own comfort and position by following the Lord even to prison. This man is a bold follower of Christ who stands by Paul in some of the most difficult circumstances. Even in this letter, he is a “fellow prisoner.” What a great encouragement to have brothers such as Aristarchus who will serve even in the most difficult of circumstances.

Mark (Acts 12:12, 12:25, 15:37-39, 2 Timothy 4:11, Philemon 24, 1 Peter 5:13)

John Mark, the cousin of Barnabas, was greatly involved in the ministry of the early church. He was a member of Paul’s missionary cohort early on, until he fell sick and had to return home. He and Barnabas worked to advance the Gospel apart from Paul for a time before they were evidently reunited at Paul’s request in 2 Timothy. Mark’s own journey was one of transformation. He went from being a nuisance to being a valuable part of the mission of God. In his first attempt to live on mission, he was overcome with sickness and then rejected by the leader of the mission. Yet, he persisted and grew as a disciple, faithfully proclaiming the gospel when given the opportunity. So, over time, he is transformed from the sickly and annoying boy that Paul does not want to bother with to being one whose presence is requested because he is “useful” (2 Tim. 4:11).

So it is with many Christians. As we grow in the Lord we often find the journey to becoming useful to be a long and rather slow process. Most Christians are more akin to John Mark than Paul. We seldom have a Damascus road experience that changes us overnight. Most of us must walk through failures and successes and learn slowly. Although we have been changed in a moment, we still must grow into that change as Mark grew.

Jesus called Justice (Only mentioned in Colossians.)

This brother was among the faithful cohort of Paul. We know little about him because he is only mentioned in this one verse of Colossians. We know that he is with Paul as he writes Colossians. We know that he was Jewish (that is what “among the circumcision” means). And we know that he was involved enough to deserve mention in the letter. Beyond that, we can only know Justus through his relationship to the others.

Identifying these men as “among the circumcision” draws the mind of the hearer to the hostile circumcision party that is mentioned throughout Acts. The church at Colossae would have been well aware of the adversarial nature of the Jews. They would have noticed how Paul was frequently followed by wealthy Jewish leaders who wanted to push the gospel message out of the cities of Asia Minor. In his identification of these brothers as “among the circumcision” Paul is sharing a victory with the church! The gospel has converted and transformed even those who were adversarial to it!  The transforming power of the Gospel of Jesus Christ transcends all boundaries. Even the most antagonistic can be transformed to become an encouragement and a fellow worker in the Kingdom of God!

[1] There are some other “Justus” mentioned in Acts. They are not the same as the Justus mentioned here. Both the names Jesus and Justus were common names among Jewish people in the first century and as a result it is easy to conflate the various men with each other.

Advertisements

Colossians 4:7-8; Brief Thoughts

Tychicus will tell you m all about my activities. He is a beloved brother and faithful minister and fellow servant in the Lord. I have sent him to you for this very purpose, that you may know how we are and that he may encourage your hearts,

At the end of Paul’s letters, he often gives specific instructions to several people who are in the ministry with him. Most of us just fly past these people, but there is much to learn in understanding who these brothers are. It is especially valuable to consider how Paul thought of his contemporaries given the context of Colossians. When we consider our identity in Christ, it is helpful to see who are considered brothers and the character traits that define them. So, let’s take some time and look through these names.

Tychicus – (Mentioned in Acts 20:4, Ephesians 6:21, 2 Timothy 4:12, and Titus 3:12).

Tychicus was part of the group that was sent ahead of Paul to wait for him at Troas during Paul’s third and final missionary Journey. He often served as a messenger for Paul to the churches. Evidently, he was trusted by Paul to deliver messages to the various churches, particularly in Asia Minor. The moniker that follows his name in Ephesians and Colossians is “beloved brother and faithful minister and fellow servant” (v.7).

The term for “beloved” is unique to Christians. It comes from the word “agape.” This is the self-sacrificing love that is exemplified in Christ. It is the love that gives up its own privileged position and character for the sake of others. Tychicus’ character exemplified this and the affection of the church also seemed to reflect this kind of self-sacrificing love. Imagine the fellowship of such a brother – one who is identified as “beloved!”

The second descriptor for Tychicus is “faithful minister.” As a minister of the Gospel, Tychicus had proved to be consistent and faithful. His labors with Paul had served to validate him as a minister of the Gospel of Christ. Unlike Timothy and Titus, we do not have a letter or address to Tychicus would enlighten us to the difficulties he faced. Our limited view of Tychicus allows us only a glimpse at what it means to be a faithful minister. We can be sure that he delivered the messages that Paul sent him to deliver. It is apparent that people enjoyed Tychicus’ arrival and he brought encouragement to the church in his reports (Eph. 6:22). He was seen as an equal and fitting messenger to send to a pastor.

The final title given to Tychicus is that of “fellow servant.” It is so easy to fly past this phrase. Slow down and ponder this for a moment. Tychicus is a “fellow servant.” This man who brought the Word of God was a delight and encouragement to the greatest of missionaries, and was consistently delivering all that he was entrusted to deliver… this man is a “fellow servant.”[i] There is no title of hierarchy. There is no militaristic commendation given him. There is no praise or crown that sets him above those who receive the message he delivers. He is equal to those to whom he is sent. The playing field is leveled in the gospel. Paul is equally submissive to Christ as you and I. Tychicus, this man to whom was entrusted the very delivery of the Word of God, is simply another servant in the Kingdom.

There are no superstars in the Kingdom of God. Only Christ is the exalted One. Only Christ is the star, everyone else is supporting cast. A Christian’s aim is to make Christ famous. Indeed, Christ’s own example is one of humiliation. In Mark’s Gospel He states quite clearly, “If anyone would be first, he must be last of all and servant of all” (Mark 9:35). In John 13, Jesus shows His disciples that the greatest is the One who has made Himself the least and that they should do likewise. In Philippians 2 Paul heralds the greatness of Jesus’ humiliation and explains that Christians ought to have the same attitude. There is one King in the Kingdom of God. The rest of the Kingdom points to Him.

m For ver. 7–9, see Eph. 6:21, 22

[i] In 1 Thessalonians 2:13 Paul refers to the teaching that he had delivered to the Thessalonian believers as “the Word of God.”

Colossians 4:5-6; Brief thoughts

Walk in wisdom toward outsiders, making the best use of the time. Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how you ought to answer each person. [i]

The final exhortation given to the church of Colossae is to “walk in wisdom” (v. 5). Believers ought to strive to live a wise lifestyle. The term translated “walk” refers to a general pattern of life. It refers to a lifestyle. It is not a term that is used in reference to moments or temporary struggles but is one that indicates a general practice of life.[ii] Generally, Christians ought to live a lifestyle that is characterized by wisdom. The word used for wisdom indicates a “skill in the affairs of life, practical wisdom, wise management as shown in forming the best plans and selecting the best means, including the idea of sound judgment and good sense.”[iii] A believer, who has understood what Christ has done to change and transform their own heart, will certainly exemplify such a life. They will strive to live a life of excellence and devotion, “as to the Lord” (Colossians 3:23).

The jury of a Christian’s life is the outside world. Even Christ echoed the sentiment of just judgment of the authenticity of believers when He said, “By this, all men will know that you are truly my disciples, if you have love for one another” (John 13:35). Our Lord and Master gave the world permission to test the veracity of our faith by judging our actions. Paul exhorts us to live wisely towards those who are outside the faith. Walking in such a lifestyle demands that we are careful with how we spend our time and what we give our attention to. Time is against us in this life. It does not slow down and it is easy to waste. So, Paul calls us to be attentive to the time we have and use it wisely.

The encouragement that follows wise living is that your speech would “always be gracious, seasoned with salt…” (v. 6a). What proceeds from the mouth, comes from the overflow of the heart (Mat. 12:34). The most tangible evidence for the purity and strength of the heart is that which comes from the mouth. If one is wise, then the tongue will speak wisdom. What is the evidence that comes from your mouth? What do your words reveal about your heart? Paul’s call to wisdom is particularly addressing the relationship between Christians and those who are outside the faith. The greatest testimony one can give to the transformative power of the gospel is the lifestyle they live. That lifestyle must be consistent with their speech. So a Christian’s speech ought to lead people to see the transformation that has occurred within their own heart.

Paul explains that this speech is to be “gracious, seasoned with salt” (v.6). Put simply, Christians ought to make the world better. Gracious speech is kind speech. It is a considerate voice amidst a world that denies kindness. Further, grace brings beauty and benevolence to the subject. If a person is consistently gracious to others, they will be an agent of refreshment and beauty to the world around them. This kindness that overflows from a wise lifestyle makes the difficulties of this world more palatable. Like salt in a meal, so the true believer’s speech brings taste to a tasteless environment.

Finally, wisdom dictates that one ought to be able to answer the questions and needs of the surrounding world. If your speech is flowing from a wise life and is “gracious” towards others, then you will be able to answer the difficult questions that are posed by an anxious world. This is not to say that Christians have all the answers, but that their lifestyle is supported by their public proclamation of truth. There are questions that are difficult to answer. Yet, the hope that covers a Christian’s life and the wisdom by which they maintain their consistency provides an answer. Though it may not answer every nuance of every theological inquisition, wise living and gracious speech give answer and evidence to a changed life wrought by Christ.

 

[i] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2016). (Col 4:5–6). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

[ii] Some translations attempt to explain this discrepancy by adding the word “practice” or “continuing” to their translations. For example, “no one born of God practices sin” (1 John 3:9 NASB).

[iii] Zodhiates, S. (2000). The complete word study dictionary: New Testament (electronic ed.). Chattanooga, TN: AMG Publishers.

Colossians 4:3-4; Brief Thoughts

At the same time, pray also for us, that God may eopen to us a door for the word, fto declare the mystery of Christ, gon account of which I am in prison— that I may make it clear, which is how I ought to speak. [1]

Urging believers to remain consistent in prayer, Paul couples his exhortation with a practical request. Paul calls the believing church of Colossae to pray for him while he is in prison. It was a basic understanding of first-century Christianity that believers would think about and pray for other believers in prison (Heb. 13:3). Somewhere along the line, the modern Christian culture of the west has forgotten or at least neglected the normative understanding of suffering together in spirit. When in a modern church, one must not bring up suffering or imprisonment of believers. It will certainly make everyone uncomfortable to consider the weight of brothers and sisters who suffer persecution. Yet, for the early church, persecution was something in which to rejoice (see Paul and Silas’ example in Acts 16:16-40). Even Jesus’ teachings included an understanding that persecution would result in blessing (Mt. 5:10). So, it should be a primary delight of the Christian community to support the persecuted brothers in prayer.

Paul’s request seems radical in that he does not ask for freedom from prison, or health, or even favor from the prison guards. Rather, Paul’s chief concern is that he would be able to share the gospel. The very same gospel that landed him in prison. Unlike many modern pastors who seek lavish comfort, luxurious lifestyles, and easy circumstances, Paul longs only for the word of God to be made clear. It is this severe discrepancy between Paul’s faithful ministry and the modern charlatan that makes his request seem radical. Indeed, his request is actually simple and normal. A believer understands that God is sovereign over his/her particular circumstance. Therefore, a believer finds purpose even when imprisoned. So Paul seeks prayer support for the proclamation of the gospel.

There are three elements to Paul’s request for prayer support. First, he requests that there would be an opportunity, referred to as an “open door.” A door for the gospel may open, and yet a believer may fail to take advantage of that opportunity. Paul is willing to take the opportunity, he simply needs to have the opportunity placed before him. Further, he asks specifically that God would open the door. Paul recognizes that God must be the one moves in the heart of man to open the door to the gospel. It is a necessity for the Spirit of God to move in order for the gospel to permeate the heart of a man. No amount of clever argumentation or apologetic can open the heart of a man. The wickedness of the heart is too great, God must intervene. So it is God who opens the door for the gospel.

Second, Paul asks that they would pray that he declares the “mystery of Christ.” Paul elaborates on this mystery earlier in Colossians 1:26-27. The mystery that Paul proclaims is that of Christ making his dwelling place in the heart of those who believe. Once God has opened the door, Paul asks for prayer that he would take advantage of the opportunity.

Third, Paul seeks the covering of prayer “that [he] would make it clear.” He wants to speak the gospel with clarity and conviction. The gospel must be clear. In order for the gospel to be clear, the gospel must be what is preached. It is not good to teach people to simply behave better. It is not adequate to teach people how to feel better. It is not glorifying to God to proclaim something other than the truth of the gospel. The gospel must be presented clearly! That is, “that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, and that he appeared the Cephas, then to the twelve, then he appeared to more than 500 brothers at one time…” (1 Cor. 15:3-6). So Paul wants the gospel to be clearly presented no matter the circumstance. Whether in prison or free, the gospel ought to be preached with clarity, boldness, taking every opportunity.

e See Acts 14:27

f See Rom. 16:25

g ver. 18; Eph. 6:20; See Phil. 1:7

[1] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2016). (Col 4:3–4). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

Just short encouragement.

This is mere short encouragement for you today.

Christians are defined by their love for one another (John 13:35). Today, let these scriptures inspire you to love well:

  1. Be at peace with one another (Mark 9:50),
  2. Love one another (John 13:34),
  3. Be devoted to one another (Rom. 12:10),
  4. Live in harmony with one another (Rom. 12:16),
  5. Cease to pass judgment on one another (Rom. 14:13) ,
  6. Accept one another (Rom. 15:7),
  7. Instruct one another (Rom. 15:7),
  8. Greet one another (Rom. 16:16),
  9. Serve one another (Gal. 6:2),
  10. Carry one another’s burdens (Gal 6:2),
  11. Be patient, bearing with one another in love (Eph. 4:2),
  12. Be kind and compassionate to one another (Eph. 4:32),
  13. Forgive one another (Eph. 4:32),
  14. Speak to one another with psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs (Eph. 5:19),
  15. Submit to one another out of reverence for Christ (Eph 5:21),
  16. In humility consider one another better than yourselves (Phil. 2:3),
  17. Teach one another (Col. 3:16),
  18. Admonish one another (Col. 3:16),
  19. Encourage one another (1 Thes. 5:11),
  20. Spur one another towards love and good deeds (Heb. 10:24),
  21. Cease to slander one another (James 4:11),
  22. Cease to grumble against one another (James 5:9),
  23. Confess your sins to one another (James 5:16),
  24. Pray for one another (James 5:16),
  25. Clothe yourselves with humility towards one another (1 Peter 5:5).

Colossians 4:2; Brief Thoughts

2Continue steadfastly in prayer, being watchful in it with thanksgiving.

It is the nature of a Christian to pray. As we have seen in Colossians, the identity of a believer has been so adjusted and transformed that they are no longer the same as they were before Christ. The practices and normative behavior that held believers captive are no longer the dominating reality. That nature that was solely given to sin has now been enslaved to righteousness (Romans 6:18). Rather, they are indwelt by the Holy Spirit and given a new nature that is in a constant state of being renewed and conformed to the image of Christ (Col 3:10). Along with the new nature and a progressively growing identity in Christ, Christians also have a unique connection to God. Consider for a moment the connection of a created being to the One true God who has created all things. This God does not have to lend His ear to His creation. He has no responsibility to allow a created being to engage with Him. Yet, He so deeply loves His own that He has made a sure connection to them. A connection that cannot be removed or taken from His people. There is nothing that can sever the connection of prayer from the believer to the very ear of God. The God of the universe engages with the lowly of creation, listening to them. When we lose sight of this great truth, our prayers will cease. When we forget the gravity and power of prayer, we will fail to exercise prayer in our lives. When we remember the great privilege of prayer we are inspired to pray all the more.

Paul’s admonition to the Colossian believers to “continue steadfastly in prayer” is an exhortation that could better be rendered, “steadfastly pray.” The Christian is to be faithful in consistent prayer. The connection between Christians and their God should be such a joyous occasion that the remaining steadfast in prayer is natural and a delight. Too often in the modern western church, self-professing Christians find it relatively impossible to maintain a consistent prayer life. So difficult a task for the average American Christian that our churches have books, work through campaigns, and even provide special classes for those who struggle to pray. Yet, prayer is to be as breathing for the Christian. As an infant learns to cry to their parent for milk, so a Christian prays. It is second nature for a believer to cry out to God. Still, because of our own weakness, Paul exhorts the believer to steadfastly pray!

How are Christians supposed to pray? By “being watchful in it with thanksgiving.” The term “watchful” means “To watch and refrain from sleep.”[1] This term bears with it the idea that the one who is watchful is striving to stay alert and aware amidst an environment that is tempting them to close their eyes and sleep. A Christian who has fallen asleep or given into sloth is useless in the Kingdom of God. They have shut their eyes to the leading of the Lord and as a result will not be effective. “Wake yourself, wake yourself, stand up, o Jerusalem,” cries the prophet Isaiah. In Romans 13:11 Paul reminds the faithful, “that the hour has come for you to wake from sleep.” In Revelation 3:2, Jesus urges the church at Sardis to “wake up, and strengthen what remains!” Believers must strive to stay alert, praying for what God has directed. These prayers are offered with gratitude. It is a wonder to consider how a person could examine the world around them and remain watchful in prayer while simultaneously being grateful. When one examines the world around and seeks to be watchful, the troubles of the world will inevitably weigh the observer down. However, Paul admonishes us to pray with thanksgiving. Thanksgiving for what? For the truth that God has not left the world. For the truth that God is present and active. For the truth that Jesus Christ the righteous has laid His life so that you might live free of sin and death. Further, gratitude stems from understanding God’s providence and sovereignty in all things. When a believer understands God’s sovereign provision and work in the world, they can rest in the confidence that God is working all things in His control according to His plan. We pray in gratitude because God is God and He is our God.

[1] Zodhiates, S. (2000). The complete word study dictionary: New Testament (electronic ed.). Chattanooga, TN: AMG Publishers.